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Planting Instructions by Flower Name

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Spring Rock Garden

At-A-Glance:

  • Spacing: varies by flower
  • Height: 6-18"
  • Blooms: late spring to early summer
  • Planting Depth: 2-5"
  • Full Sun Full Sun
  • Partial Shade Partial Shade
  • Good for cutting Good for cutting
  • Deer resistant Deer resistant
  • Fragrant Fragrant

Spring Rock Garden

Ixia Mixture

Ixia 'Yellow Emporer' and 'Phoenix'

About

Ixia are in the Iris family and are native to South Africa. Also known as corn lilies or wandflowers, they have star-shaped flowers over wiry stems and grass-like foliage. Our mixture will bloom in clusters of yellow and pink flowers, with contrasting central eyes.

Planting

Plant the corms in groupings 2 to 3" deep and 3 to 5" apart in rich, well-drained soil in an area that receives full sun. Water well after planting. Ixia also grow well in containers; plant closer, about 1" apart, and keep the soil barely moist.

Maintenance

In USDA zones 8 through 10, where ixia is hardy, fertilize in the autumn. In colder zones, fertilize in the spring after growth appears. If planted in containers, fertilize every couple weeks with an all-purpose, balanced fertilizer. Ixia prefer dry conditions when dormant, so allow them to dry out after flowering. Allow the foliage to die back on its own.

Over-wintering

Ixia will survive the winter in zones 8 through 10, and probably zone 7 with a heavy layer of mulch. In colder areas, either treat the corms as annuals or lift them for winter storage. Dig up the corms after the foliage has dried and store in paper or netted bags in a cool, dry and well-ventilated area, around 50 to 60 degrees F. If planted in containers, move them to a warm, dry, protected area or dig up the bulbs and treat as above.

Queen Fabiola Brodiaeas

Brodiaea Iaxa 'Queen Fabiola'

About

Brodiaea are native to the west coast of North America, where they grow wild in open grasslands. Also known as grass nuts and fools onion, they do well in rock gardens, planters and borders. Named after Belgian royalty, Queen Fabiola produces electric-blue, bell-shaped flowers, carried high over wiry stems. The long lasting blooms and pleasant fragrance make Queen Fabiola an excellent choice for bouquets.

Planting

Plant the corms 3" deep and 3-4" apart in well-draining soil, in an area that receives full sun to part shade. Plant bud side up. If in doubt, plant the corms sideways; the roots and shoots will naturally find their way. Water after planting and keep the upper one inch of soil moderately moist until the grass-like foliage appears. The foliage will die back just prior to flowering; withhold water after the three week bloom period.

Maintenance

Fertilize plants once a month during the growing season with an all-purpose, balanced fertilizer, following the directions on the label. If possible, allow the corms a dry, dormant period after blooming.

Over-wintering

Queen Fabiola Brodiaea are hardy in zones 5 through 9, although adding a layer of mulch is recommended to increase winter hardiness in zones 5 and 6. In colder climates, the tiny corms are usually treated as annuals.

Babiana Mixture

Babiana

About

Babiana are in the Iris family and are native to South Africa. They are also known as baboon flowers, as baboons are known to dig up the bulbs in the spring to eat. There are over 50 species of Babiana, blooming in all sorts of colors over lance-shaped leaves. Our mixture will produces spikes of sweetly fragrant flowers in shades of pink and violet.

Planting

Plant the corms 2 to 4" deep and 4 to 6" apart in an area that receives full sun; in hot areas, protection from the mid day sun is beneficial. Babiana can tolerate poor soil, but good drainage is essential. Water well after planting. Babiana also grow well in containers; plant closer, about 1-2" apart, and keep the soil barely moist.

Maintenance

In USDA zones 8 through 10, where Babiana is hardy, fertilize in the autumn. In colder zones, fertilize in the spring after growth appears. If planted in containers, fertilize every couple weeks with an all-purpose, balanced fertilizer. Babiana prefer dry conditions when dormant, so allow them to dry out after flowering. Allow the foliage to die back on its own.

Over-wintering

Babiana will survive the winter in zones 8 through 10, and probably zone 7 with a heavy layer of mulch. In colder areas, either treat the corms as annuals or lift them for winter storage. Dig up the corms after the foliage has dried and store in paper or netted bags in a cool, dry and well-ventilated area, around 50 to 60 degrees F. If planted in containers, move them to a warm, dry, protected area or dig up the bulbs and treat as above.

Moly Alliums

Allium moly

About

Alliums are in the Amaryllis family, Amaryllidaceae, and are native to the temperate regions of the Northern hemisphere. There are over 700 species, including onions, garlic, chives, shallots and leeks. The blooms of alliums are held in umbels, tight or loosely clustered individual flowers, equal in length and spreading from a common point. The foliage smells of garlic or onions when bruised (the word ‘allium’ is Latin for garlic). Alliums usually bloom in early summer, providing a link between spring-blooming bulbs and summer-blooming perennials. Moly Alliums will produce 2-3" wide clusters of golden yellow, star-shaped flowers.

Planting

Plant allium bulbs according to the label instructions, 2-3" deep and 4-5" apart. The rule of thumb is to plant two to three times as deep as the diameter of the bulb. Choose an area that receives full sun or partial shade and has good drainage. Alliums will grow in a wide variety of soils, providing it drains well.

Maintenance

Alliums are easy to grow and fairly pest free. Fertilize in the early spring with a well-balanced fertilizer. As with other spring- and summer-blooming bulbs, let the foliage die back on its own, allowing the plants to create energy for next year’s blooms. Grow among perennial plants to hide the withering foliage. Most alliums will grow from seed; deadhead the spent blooms if you do not want volunteer plants.

Over-wintering

Moly alliums are very hardy and require no special care for over-wintering.

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