Earn 50% Profit with America's #1 Earth-Friendly Fundraiser!

Skip navigation

Customer Service

Planting Instructions by Flower Name

Return To Full List of Flowers

Rock Garden Collection

At-A-Glance:

  • Hardy Zones: 3-9
  • Spacing: varies by flower
  • Height: 4-24"
  • Ships As: 5 packages of bulbs
  • Full Sun Full Sun
  • Partial Shade Partial Shade
  • Shade Shade
  • Good for cutting Good for cutting
  • Deer resistant Deer resistant
  • Fragrant Fragrant

Rock Garden Collection

Species Crocuses Mixture

Crocus chrysanthus

About:

Crocuses are in the Iris family, Iridaceae, and are native to Europe, North Africa and temperate Asia. There are 80 species and numerous hybrids, ranging in colors of yellow, white, lavender and purple, sometimes multi-colored. The spring-blooming varieties are early blooming and showy, cup-shaped blooms often appear before the snow has melted. Our Species Crocus Mixture will bloom in a cheerful mix of gold, white, lavender and striped flowers.

Planting:

Plant the pointed end up in moist, well-drained soil, 3” deep and 2-4” apart. Crocuses are not fussy about soil, and will generally grow anywhere grass grows, but they do require well-draining conditions. Choose an area that receives full to part sun during the early spring season, and plant in groups of at least ten bulbs for maximum effect.

Maintenance:

After blooming, let the foliage die back on its own, allowing the plants to create energy for next year’s blooms. If planted in a lawn, do not mow until the strappy leaves have died back. Fertilize annually either in very early spring or late fall. If conditions are favorable, crocus bulbs will naturalize over the years, multiplying and spreading. If they become too dense, they will not flower as readily. You may divide crowded bulbs either in spring, just after blooming, or in the fall. Dig up the bulbs and replant, following the planting instructions above.

Indian Hyacinths

Camassia quamash

About:

The five species of Camassia are in the Lily family, Liliaceae, and are native to southwestern Canada and northwestern U.S. The genus name is derived from the Native American words for the plants, camass or quamash. The bulbs of Indian Hyacinths, Camassia quamash, used to be an important food source, and were shared by the Native Americans with Lewis and Clark during their expedition. Indian hyacinth is now known for its grass-like leaves, spiky blue-violet flowers and ability to ‘naturalize’, or spread.

Planting:

Plant bulbs in rich, well-drained soil, in an area that receives full sun to part shade. Plant pointed end up, 4-5” deep and 4-6” apart. Water well. In nature, Camassia thrive in moist spring meadows that dry out over the summer. Wet winter soil may cause the bulbs to rot, so be sure to choose a site that drains well.

Maintenance

Provide moisture during the spring growing season. There is no need to water after blooming, as Indian Hyacinths prefer dry summer conditions. As with other spring- and summer-blooming bulbs, let the foliage die back on its own, allowing the plants to create energy for next year’s blooms. If conditions are right, the bulbs will spread and ‘naturalize’ over the area. If bulbs get too crowded, the best time to dig and divide them is in early to mid summer, after the leaves have yellowed, but are still visible.

Lavender Mountain Lilies

Ixiolirion tartaricum

About:

Ixiolirion are in the Amaryllis family and are native to Central Asia. Lavender Mountain Lilies, Ixiolirion tartaricum, is the most commonly grown species and will produce brilliant masses of lavender blooms in early summer.

Planting:

Plant bulbs in well-drained soil, either pointed end up or sideways. Plant 2-3” deep and 2-3” apart. Lavender Mountain Lilies are not too picky about light, and can be grown in full sun or areas that receive mostly shade. Plant in large groupings, or ‘drifts’, for maximum effect. Water well.

Maintenance:

Provide moisture during the spring and early summer growing season. As with other spring- and summer-blooming bulbs, let the foliage die back on its own, allowing the plants to create energy for next year’s blooms. If conditions are right, the bulbs will spread and ‘naturalize’ over the area. If bulbs get too crowded, the best time to dig and divide them is in midsummer, after the leaves have yellowed, but are still visible.

Harmony Irises

Iris reticula 'Harmony'

About:

Iris have their own family, Iridaceae, and are native to temperate regions of the northern hemisphere. There are more than 200 species, with great variation in growth habit, flower form and color. Reticulated irises originated in the Caucasus region and grow from bulbs. Harmony is a low-growing variety, with royal blue flowers and white-edged yellow blotches. It has a gentle fragrance, which has been compared to violets.

Planting:

Choose a well-draining area that gets full sun to part shade. Plant bulbs pointed end up, 3-4” deep and 2-3” apart. For best effect, plant the bulbs in large groupings; the small flowers will be lost in the landscape if planted in small numbers. These iris are also an excellent choice for rock gardens. Water well. Mulch heavily in areas with cold winters, to provide protection from the freezing and thawing cycles.

Maintenance

Provide moisture during the spring growing season. There is no need to water after blooming, as reticulated irises prefer a dry summer. If conditions are right, Harmony Iris will naturalize and spread.

Striped Squills

Puschkinia libanotica

About:

Puschkinia belongs to the Lily family, Liliaceae, is native to the Middle East, and just has the one species, P. libanotica, aka Striped Squill. The plants have strappy leaves, and flowers of a very pale bluish-white, with delicate, darker stripes. The blooms exude a faint, spicy fragrance.

Planting:

Plant in average, well-drained soil, in an area that receives full to part sunlight. Plant bulbs pointed end up, 3” deep and 2-3” apart. Plant in large groupings, or ‘drifts’, for maximum effect. Striped Squills also do well in rock gardens. Water well.

Maintenance

Provide moisture during the spring growing season. There is no need to water after blooming, as Squills prefer dry summer conditions. As with other spring- and summer-blooming bulbs, let the foliage die back on its own, allowing the plants to create energy for next year’s blooms. If conditions are right, the bulbs will spread and ‘naturalize’ over the area. If bulbs get too crowded, the best time to dig and divide them is in early summer, after the leaves have yellowed, but are still visible.

Receive Program Updates by Email