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Persian Buttercups

At-A-Glance:

  • Hardy Zones: 8-10
  • Spacing: 6"
  • Height: 12-18"
  • Blooms: summer
  • Planting Depth: 2"
  • Ships As: package of 20 tubers
  • Full Sun Full Sun
  • Good for cutting Good for cutting

Persian Buttercups

Ranunculus asiaticus

About:

There are hundreds of species in the Buttercup family, Ranunculaceae. The Latin name is derived from Rana, meaning frog, as many species grow in bogs and around the edges of ponds.  Persian Buttercups, or Ranunculus asiaticus, are native to the Mediterranean region, southeastern Europe and northeastern Africa. The saucer-shaped flowers bloom in shades of yellow, white, orange, red and pink, over a rosette of leaves.


Planting:

Prior to planting, soak the claw-like tubers in water for a few hours. Choose an area that receives full sun. Plant the claw-end of the tubers facing downwards in light, rich, well-drained soil, 2" deep and 6" apart. Persian Buttercups also grow well in containers. Follow the same directions, but plant the tubers a little closer in a good quality potting soil.

Maintenance:

Water well upon planting, then sparingly until top-growth appears. When buds develop, keep the plants evenly moist, watering with a diluted liquid fertilizer. The plants will produce a succession of blooms over a several week period midsummer. After blooming, give the plants a dormancy period. Withhold water and allow the foliage to die back.

Over-wintering:

Persian Buttercups are only hardy to USDA zone 8. In zones 7 and colder, the plants may be treated as annuals or lifted and stored inside over the winter. To store the tubers, dig them up after the foliage has withered. Allow the tubers to dry for a few days in a dry, protected area. Store in single layers in peat moss or vermiculite at 40 to 50 degrees F. Prior to replanting in the spring, the plants may be propagated by dividing, or cutting, the tubers apart.

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